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help with new dog


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#1 ScarredWolf

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 12:22 AM

My husband and I recently got a red Doberman named Felix. Our old husky/lab died a while ago and the house was so empty without him, so we started looking for another dog. We decided we wanted a Doberman and told a few people that we were looking for one. I was looking into getting one from SCD when my aunt, who is a dog breeder, told me about Felix. He had been living at a vet's office because his owner could no longer take care of him. He was starving himself and had lost a bunch of weight because he was depressed because of losing his family. My husband and I decided to drive to Illinois to pick him up, this was a couple of weeks ago.
Felix is a recently neutered, two year old, male. He is a really affectionate and we love him already, but he has some issues. Since he was living in a kennel for so long, he has forgotten a lot of things. We are working on most of the problems and he is improving. The only thing that still isn't working out is his potty training. He doesn't pee in the house anymore, but he still poops. He is really quiet and I would like to teach him a way that he can let me know when he has to go out. I have heard about using a bell on the door, but how exactly do you go about that? How will he tell the difference between just going out to potty or going for a walk? I don't want him to just ring the bell to be able to go outside and stare at stuff. I don't blame him for wanting to do that, but I can't do that all the time.

#2 Bumpette

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 10:17 AM

You've only had him a couple of weeks, it will take some time to get him acclimated to your routines. It sounds like he is doing well by not peeing in the house anymore, that is progress! Just be consistent in letting him out regularly for awhile, and I'm sure he will catch on. He may not realize he needs to 'ask' to go out. We have a male that we adopted 4+ years ago, he doesn't 'ask' to go out, even yet. (Although he doesn't go to the bathroom in the house either). We just make sure we let him out on a regular basis. A male we had in the past, taught himself to clink the doorknob when he wanted out. But he would do it just to go out and run around in the yard, as well as to go to the bathroom. If he was bored, he would clink the doorknob, because he knew we'd come open the door, and he could run around in the yard. :LOL: Good luck with your new adoption. And thank you for helping a boy in need. :chris: Could you post a picture of him?
Happiness is a decision.

Susie Q
SCD's Darlin' Darcy - CGC
SCD's Mr. McBump - CGC
SCD's Liddle Diddles - CGC

Forever in our hearts:
SCD's One Cool Dude (7/05-4/10)
Ralph (SCD) (10/99-6/05)
Rex (SCD) (6/93-9/99)
Sheeba (BYB) (11/82-4/93)

#3 Karen A

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 06:38 PM

Try keeping him crated when you cannot keep your eye on him constantly. When you let him out of the crate, take him outside immediately until he does his business. If he doesn't poop, you can keep him tied to your belt loop with a leash so he can't get out of your site and do the deed.
You might want to think twice about the door bell....I taught my dog that trick and I heard bells nonstop :chris: . She rung the bell to go out every 5 minutes! I just let mine out periodically throughout the day and have never had any issues....except that they never want to go out in the rain or snow :LOL:
We give dogs the time we can spare, the space we can spare, and the love we can spare. And, in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made.
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#4 doberpagegirl

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 07:19 PM

I would agree with Karen. Don't give him the opportunity to sneak off and mess. Keep him hooked to you. Or, use baby gates. Our hall which leads to the kitchen is always gated. The dogs don't go through without permission. At least that way you can confine his mess to one room while you work on it. Congratulations on your new boy and welcome to the board! We would love to see some pictures.

It matters to the one you save.

SCD's Out on Bail CGC (December 17, 2008- April 27, 2018)
SCD's Stone Soup
SCD's Sixpence in my shoe
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#5 Cheri

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 08:03 AM

I sympathize. I went through the same thing when I adopted my female Doberman about a year and a half ago. She was about a year old at the time. That was the first time I had acquired a dog as an adult and not a puppy, and I did get a little frustrated, thinking why isn't she getting it already? But looking back, a couple weeks is a very short time and not nearly long enough for a dog to adjust to their new home. Plus, we have to remember that they have been through some tough times. Be patient, and try your best to keep one eye on him at all times. And by the way, I've owned a few dogs who never learned to "ask" to go out. The female I just mentioned never asks, and that's why we just had an accident a couple weeks ago. My husband and I both realized neither of us had put the dogs out in quite a while. My other dog, the male, goes to the back door and whines, but most of the time, it's just because he wants to go outside, not because he has to go potty. Welcome to the board and please keep us posted on Felix's progress!
HMDD Natasha Noelle, BN, RE, CGC
Lyndobe's Lo And Behold (Logan), RE, CGC


Forever In My Heart......
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#6 Bumpette

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 08:37 AM

If he doesn't poop, you can keep him tied to your belt loop with a leash so he can't get out of your site and do the deed.

Good point Karen, I had forgotten that one. :chris: The only one we've done that with was Liddy. She was leashed to one of us, whenever she wasn't in her crate, for about the first 2-3 weeks she was here. How could I forget that?! :LOL: :LOL:
Happiness is a decision.

Susie Q
SCD's Darlin' Darcy - CGC
SCD's Mr. McBump - CGC
SCD's Liddle Diddles - CGC

Forever in our hearts:
SCD's One Cool Dude (7/05-4/10)
Ralph (SCD) (10/99-6/05)
Rex (SCD) (6/93-9/99)
Sheeba (BYB) (11/82-4/93)

#7 ScarredWolf

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 07:15 PM

Posted Image

Posted Image

Thanks for the advice, I will keep you updated. :chris:

#8 Bumpette

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 07:44 PM

Wow what a beautiful boy!
Happiness is a decision.

Susie Q
SCD's Darlin' Darcy - CGC
SCD's Mr. McBump - CGC
SCD's Liddle Diddles - CGC

Forever in our hearts:
SCD's One Cool Dude (7/05-4/10)
Ralph (SCD) (10/99-6/05)
Rex (SCD) (6/93-9/99)
Sheeba (BYB) (11/82-4/93)

#9 Arda

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 08:41 PM

Wait till they have to catch him with that collar on. She needs more than advice. She needs an obedience class.
A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link.

#10 doberpagegirl

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 10:09 PM

He is gorgeous! He doesn't look overly skinny- I'm sure he'll fill out in no time. You should see some of these kids Arda gets- skin and bones. They usually fill out by week two or three except extreme cases.

An obedience class is always a good idea with a new dog. Even if the dog is already trained, an obedience class will help establish you as the boss, and you bond so much doing obedience. I swear Alley is as proud as me when she learns something new. :chris:

It matters to the one you save.

SCD's Out on Bail CGC (December 17, 2008- April 27, 2018)
SCD's Stone Soup
SCD's Sixpence in my shoe
SCD's Hurricane Alley CGC (August 12, 2007- September 11, 2014)
SCD's Easter Buddy CGC (August 12, 2007- July 5, 2012)
Page, Princess Extraordinaire - (July 9, 2000- July 31, 2007)


#11 ScarredWolf

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 09:26 AM

I would like to get him into an obedience class because it seems like he has forgotten a lot because he lived in a kennel for so long. The woman I got him from bought him that collar as a going away present. He is a little too skinny for it right now, so I had to buy him a new one. Are there any training exercises I can do at home with him to help with his focus? He has a hard time focusing on me when we are outside because there are so many new things. When he sees people while we are on walks he wants to go say hi, but it looks like he is fixated on them. The only way I can get his attention back to to walk a different way. I don't want him to scare anyone. I know he is nice, but other people don't.

#12 DeeDeeWedd

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 10:03 AM

Posted Image

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Thanks for the advice, I will keep you updated. :chris:



HE IS GORGEOUS!!!!

#13 Cheri

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 11:57 AM

He is a very good-looking boy. He has such a regal and noble look in that picture. And he doesn't look too very much underweight. I, too, believe very strongly in obedience classes for dogs. Not only for teaching them the manners they need to be well-behaved at home and in public, but also because both you and your dog are likely to have lots of fun! I see you're from the Ann Arbor area. I strongly urge you to check out the Ann Arbor Dog Training Club, aadtc.org, or Northfield Dog Training, northfielddogtraining.com. I have been training at both places with my two Dobermans for over a year.

One thing you can start with is teaching name recognition and the "Watch" command. When you call his name, he should look at you. If he's not doing that already, you can practice with some treats. Say his name, if he immediately looks at you, reward with a treat. Don't reward him if you have to call him repeatedly. From there, when you are getting his attention, tell him "Watch" or "Watch Me," and try to hold his attention for just a few seconds at first. Reward with a treat. Build the time up gradually, getting him to watch you for longer and longer periods of time. Reward him only when you have his complete attention. If he gets good at it, then you can add some distractions like someone walking by or dropping an object on the floor near him. You can work up to using this when you are on walks, to get his attention back on you and off of whatever he's fixated on.

I would be happy to give you more information about the two training places I recommended. Just send me a PM via this board.
HMDD Natasha Noelle, BN, RE, CGC
Lyndobe's Lo And Behold (Logan), RE, CGC


Forever In My Heart......
Cherick's Diamond Devil (Maxwell) 1987-1995
Toledobe's Extrovert (Savanna) 1996-2008

#14 ScarredWolf

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 02:36 PM

He was from a line of champions, the person who bought him paid $3,000 for him then banned him from the house a couple of years later.
I will try the "watch me" command, I bet he will catch on quick. I make him sit before I give him his food, so now whenever I go to feed him he sits before I even ask.

#15 Annie Moon

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 08:43 AM

You've got some great advice.
I have nothing to add except that he is BEAUTIFUL!!!!!!!!
Congratulations!
In Memory of Mariah He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.  ~Unknown~


#16 Arda

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 08:50 AM

PLEASE remember that a champion blood line, a champion does not make. Get that spiked collar off that dog and get him into a flat, martingale, or choker collar.
A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link.

#17 ScarredWolf

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 09:24 AM

He has a flat collar on now, those pictures were taken before I got him. What's wrong with a spike collar once he is well behaved?

#18 CAB

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 09:32 AM

I would think he could easily slip out of that collar. My senior has slipped out of a collar like that before. Now I always use a choker or a Bumpette martingale. And he is well behaved. The reason he slipped out was because he was scared.
The embedded collars in his neck when we got him and he goes back and extends the gentle paw to the human race. One heck of a dog.

-Arda Barber

#19 ScarredWolf

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 09:36 AM

Yeah, I can see that. We may just use it when he is in the house then because his previous owner spent a lot of money on it as a going away present.

#20 Arda

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 09:47 AM

Spiked collars
1. They give the public the wrong opinion of the Dobermann.
2. They are too heavy on their necks.
3. When your dog lunges away from you for some stupid reason as they do from time to time, and you grab the collar to stop him, you will remember that it hurt.
4. They are not appropriate for Danes, Greyhounds, Dobes, Dalmatians, or other thin necked dogs.

Too much weight over a long period of time on the neck of these dogs can and does cause severe problems in the neck. Just because something costs a lot does not mean it is better. A Dobermann does not need one of those to be recognized as a Dobermann.

Just my humble and uneducated opinion.
A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link.




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